What Not To DO In The U.S.A.

While there is so much to do in exploring a new country and new culture, certain boundaries and rules must be respected to have an entertaining holiday. The USA is filled with adventure of all sorts, and to enjoy them uninterruptedly here a few things that you must NOT do-

1.Over travelling

It’s surely is tempting to leave your footprints on most of the places in the US. But here is the fun fact, the continental United States is larger than Europe, and thus, travelling everywhere in a short span could make you ready to drop. It has gorgeous cities like Arizona, Washington and New York, and wrapping all the tours in one go could overload.

2.Drink and Drive

It is not acceptable at all! If the police find you guilty, a hefty fine is issued right on your face.

3.Smoking anywhere

It is everyone’s right to breathe clean air and with this philosophy, many places in the USA have banned smoking. The workplaces and public places are witnessing a great initiative of being smoke-free.

4.Showing a middle finger

OH, It’s the USA- everything is cool here! If you are visiting with this mentality, you might get a setback. Pointing a middle finger to someone can get you killed in the USA. And we ain’t kidding. While other gestures like putting a thumbs up, having hands in the pocket or using a left hand are perfectly common.

5.Getting too much into other space

Hugs are not one of the favourite gestures of Americans. Greeting with handshakes are acceptable but don’t go forward to kissing and hugging people around. If you find the other person taking a step back, you can recognise that you are entering into his space. Avoid confrontations like peeping into other’s phones, wearing dark glasses, etc. Also, be careful of how you hold your limbs in a crowded bus or train.

6.Not tipping

It is not your local restaurant where you can skip without tipping at all. Tipping in large could be culturally sensitive in many European or Asian countries, but American culture doesn’t work that way. Whenever you are receiving any kind of service, you must tip about 12-20 per cent of the amount.

7.Silence in conversation

The uncomfortable zone builds up with Americans when a conversation is followed by a long silence. They appreciate the effort taken to have a mindful and interesting conversation. A silence of more than 3 seconds could be weird and if you are tending to have a problem with language, make use of the fillers like, Oh Sure, Yeah, And then, etc.

8.Jokes on race and gender

Few things can catch the eyes of the locals. One of these is discussing race, gender, sexuality, colour or weight. Your strong opinions on any of these topics could not end well, because someone or the other is bound to get offended. So, the best escape is simply nodding or carrying a pleasant smile.

9.Talking about politics

When you are interacting with people you know very well, taking a side could not harm. But being an outsider, sitting with a group of strangers, and taking a strong stance on a political candidate could arise issues. Nothing is better than enjoying the conversation.

10.Staring at woman

Making women uncomfortable with staring, gawking and flirting can invite the police. If you are interested, approaching them kindly and with courtesy is the key. If a woman is inviting you over, take it as a friendly invitation. Do not get misled with such requests by a female.

11.Talking about disliking football

Soccer is better than football, you say it and you get a pitiful look. You have to like football here as no one would hear anything against it. Also, nobody will take your lecture on football. Do not preach your virtues of what you know extra besides American football. Just love the game and people will love you back.

12.Comparing your country with America

Americans have a belief that their country is the best. And if you combat this thought bringing in your country and your values to be top-notch, you might get it back. So, go with the flow and do not intervene in their “we are superior” chats.

The USA is a masterpiece and one can spend a lavish holiday, only with certain inhibitions in mind. Find yourself a great deal with Rayna and revel in a magical trip.


Original article by  USA Travel Blog: https://go.shr.lc/2RUFOkc

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New Year, New Cultural Activities!

The start of New Year’s Day, at midnight on January 1st, is heralded by fireworks, parties and special events, which are often televised. Very few people have to work on the day itself. For many it is a day of recovery from the New Year’s Eve celebrations the previous night. In some towns and cities, parades are held and special football games are played. The birth of the first baby in the New Year is often celebrated with gifts to his or her parents and appearances in local newspapers and on local news shows. Many people make New Year’s resolutions. These are usually promises to themselves that they will improve something in their own lives. Common New Year’s resolutions are to stop smoking or drinking alcohol, to lose weight, exercise more or to live a healthier lifestyle.

Martin Luther King Day, January 20th is a relatively new federal holiday and there are few long standing traditions. It is seen as a day to promote equal rights for all Americans, regardless of their background. Some educational establishments mark the day by teaching their pupils or students about the work of Martin Luther King and the struggle against racial segregation and racism. In recent years, federal legislation has encouraged Americans to give some of their time on this day as volunteers in citizen action groups.

Action Plan:

Things you can do to celebrate this January!

  1. Make a list of resolutions to try to keep in the new year 
  2. Share with your host family what you do for new years in your home country and when it is
  3. Eat food considered lucky to eat going into the New Year! In America, these include black eyed peas, cabbage, and pork.
  4. Listen to Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I have a dream” speech
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Coping with Holidays Abroad

The holidays can be a joyful time for many of us. Students may look forward to gift giving and having time off from school… But as we all know, the holidays are also a time when a student will be prone to homesickness and other stressors. By remembering why we love traveling abroad and not forgetting about home, we can cope with the holidays while we’re abroad.

Remember the many benefits travel provides. There’s a reason so many working professionals are shifting their attitudes toward remote working and bargaining for more paid time off or a few work-from-home days each week. Seeing the world doesn’t just teach you about what you’re made of as you race to make trains and use Google Translate to figure out what you’re buying at the grocery store, but O’Leary says traveling is soul-fulfilling.

Acknowledge your emotions. “It can be hard to handle the changes and transitions that accompany frequent moves and relocations. While it’s great to see new places, there’s also a lot to be said for settling into some consistency,” O’Leary said. But the first step to handling the weeks and the days is admitting and accepting those feelings of sadness. “If you acknowledge the fact that there will be things you’ll miss and things you’re happy to do without, you’ll set yourself up for success and avoid being blindsided by your emotions.”

Make time to talk with loved ones. Since most places of the world will offer some sort of internet connectivity, there’s no better time than when you’re feeling down scrolling through Facebook of family photos than to upgrade to the high-speed option and chat with your fam. Even if you can’t pass them the eggnog or throw a football with your brothers, you can be part of their celebrations digitally.
Creating that feeling of connection is a smart, healthy way to make the most out of your nomadic lifestyle, while also having the space you need to explore, according to O’Leary. “Reaching out to family members allows you to keep up with personal details and also share in memories that are important to you,” she added.

Send holiday cards or letters from wherever you are. You might also opt to write a holiday card list this year — and OK, check it twice if you have time before boarding for a last-minute side trip to Bali. “Writing letters is a fantastic way to organize your thoughts and create a meaningful connection. While it may be hard for you to receive mail if your address is changing frequently, the simple act of sending letters helps you focus on what’s important to you despite the distance,” O’Leary said. After all, you don’t need Santa’s sleigh to make it around the world — a festive stamp on a postcard will ring in the season just fine, no matter where your reindeer, err, next adventure, takes you.

Original article by Travel and Leisure Blog Writer Lindsay Tigar

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